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Digital Camera - Point & Shoot - Imaging Guidelines - Fingers or Thumb

Guidelines for imaging a subject's fingers or thumb

Fingers - Imaging Guide

Photo Name: Fingers or Thumb

Subject Positioning: Photographer’s subject hand is positioned on a flat color tone (blue, green or grey) piece of paper or cloth.  Photographer’s other hand is used to take the picture.

Room Lighting: Use typical exam room lighting, such as fluorescent.  Do not add lighting from an external source to improve the image.

Distance Camera to Subject: About 3-4 inches

Photographer Tips: One hand is being photographed and the other is being used to take the picture.  Steady the camera by placing your shooting forearm on a book on the table and shoot the photo using one hand.  Frame a close up of your four fingers or thumb.  Remember the framing so that you can repeat it with another camera.

Reasoning: If the camera cannot focus at 4 inches or closer (in macro mode), then it is not worth purchasing.  You want a digital camera than can take an excellent up-close photograph of skin (lesions).

Flash Settings: We recommend setting to “Auto”, as this is what most users would find easiest.  In Macro mode, the flash will probably be turned off, automatically.  If it flashes in Macro mode, you need to note that information.  If the camera flashes, you should take another photo with “Flash Off.”

Macro Settings: “On” or “Auto Macro,” if available.  This image is a test of the macro capability.  For clinical use, it is best to consider cameras that can take a macro photo at 4 inches (10 cm) or closer.

 

Sample Images - Fingers

Differences in Color

These photographs were taken with two different Kodak cameras set to similar settings under identical conditions, one taken after the other.  When comparing photos it is important that settings and conditions are documented for each image taken:

This close up photograph of the finger demonstrates how two cameras by the same manufacturer can have differences in color.  Notice that the images retain excellent detail.

Difference in Detail

These photographs were taken with two different cameras set to similar settings under identical conditions, one taken after the other.  When comparing photos, it is important that settings and conditions are documented for each image taken:

This close up photograph of the finger demonstrates subtle differences in detail.  The detail is best recognized when the images are zoomed to 100%.

Fingers A Detail - Color Rating 3, Detail Rating 4
Fingers B Detail - Color Rating 2, Detail Rating 4
Fingers C Detail - Color Rating 3, Detail Rating 2

 

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